Talking Tiny Terror and O Bass – Orange Amplification Interview

We talk new gear with the legendary Adrian Emsley

Orange O-Bass (Orange) - 6

NAMM 2016 was a fantastic year for the guitar world, yielding new products from some of the world’s most prestigious and well-known brands, including Orange. We have already spoken about some of this new equipment in an earlier blog, but at NAMM 2016 we were lucky enough to chat to Orange Technical Director and lead designer Adrian Emsley, to get a better insight into the new products that the world renowned brand was revealing this year.

Adrian, we’ve heard that the new Tiny Terror, christened the ‘Shiny Terror’, is going to be very rare. Just how rare?

Well, there’s only going to be 110 made!

It’s been ten years since the Tiny Terror was first revealed. What inspired the new 10th anniversary amp?

We decided to discontinue the original and make it rare, really.

We’re still keeping the Dark Terror the Jim Root Signature and the OR15, but now if you want an original Tiny Terror, now you have to get an original Tiny Terror, (he laughs).
Tiny terror 10th anniversary head and cabinet

Why is Orange stopping the Tiny Terror?

I suppose you just can’t keep releasing stuff. It’s the end of the line and you just have to discontinue stuff or you have too many products. We’re having a cull at the moment and you have to move on.

What is so different about this version of the amp?

It’s still the original Tiny Terror, but this version is hand wired, made with stainless steel and it comes with a 2X10 cab with Alnico gold speakers fitted. It’s a limited edition amp – it’s like a Viking funeral for the Terror.

What kind of musicians would you say usually play Tiny Terror amps?

Loads of musicians really, actually too many to mention. Big bands and artists use them to warm up, but we can’t say who they are as they’re not our artists. You can watch our documentary online with a few artists talking about how they use a Tiny Terror.

Could you tell us a little about the new Two Stroke pedal?

The Two Stroke is basically a clean boost, but you’ve got two parametrics on it so you can make it a treble boost and a mid boost, in fact it’ll boost and cut whatever you want, it puts you in front of the amp in a certain way.

orange two stroke

What about the detonator? That’s quite an interesting reveal this year.

The Detonator is an amp switcher, but with everything taken care of. This includes earth loops, isolation, switching noise etc. It runs two amps properly – how it should work.

Who would benefit from this?

Anyone who might want to run two amps at once would find this useful. So you might want to add an amp for lead, or you might not want anymore gain and just want to add another one for that lead. You might want to run two all the time to get a certain sound. It’s up to you. If the light is blue it’s both amps and if you switch both back off again it goes back to the original amp. Simple.

Orange amp detonator ABY switch

What other new amps do you have out?

We’ve got the 4 stroke bass amps, we’ve just launched these at the show. They’re great bass amps. It’s 4 band parametric and you can pretty much get any sound out of it, it’s absurd really. You’ve got fat compressor on there and output level and we’re pretty pleased with the way it came out. It’s the OB-1 300 and 500 output stage with a different pre-amp.

Orange 4 stroke bass

Tell us about the O-Bass. This is something that people have been excited about since 2014.

With the O Bass I wanted something quite striking and classic, vintage looking. Really simple and something to be used. I also wanted it to be affordable. I didn’t really want much (he laughs), but we managed to crack it. They’re semi jumbo frets, 2.8 mil frets actually.

What sounds are you getting out of that?

It’s kind of similar to a P-Bass pickup. It’s 8 mill forward to a P-Bass which is actually bang in the harmonic zone in this neck, so you get more growl and the higher notes stay fatter sounding. I guess the balance is all just a little better. It’s slightly lighter than a regular bass too.

What was the inspiration behind this bass? How did it come to be?

Me and Charlie drew it up. I wanted something classic looking, striking but cool. Easy to use and simple that just sounds really good. This is the first venture into guitars so we’ve just started with one bass. People thought we’d do a guitar but I said “Let’s just do a bass!”

The sustain and harmonic growl is pretty impressive – *he plays some riffs which nearly blow our heads off.* I’m happy with the turn out. *We agree*

Orange o-bass

What’s next for Orange?

We’ve got more guitar stuff coming soon, but at the moment we’re concentrating on pedals and amps. That’s all I can tell you at the moment.

Is that the direction Orange are going in? More guitar orientated stuff?

We’re doing headphones right now too, but there are a few more guitar products coming that I can’t really talk about…(he laughs)

Exciting times lie ahead for Orange Amplification Indeed.

To view the full range of Orange equipment, visit the Dawsons website.

About Lee Glynn

Lee Glynn is a guitarist and multi-instrumentalist who lives in Liverpool, England. After moving to the UK from Perth, Australia, Lee enjoyed a successful career as guitarist in Liverpool based rock band Sound of Guns.
After releasing two albums, a myriad of EP’s/singles and touring extensively around the world for 6 years including stops at Glastonbury, Latitude Festival, as well as the coveted Reading & Leeds Festivals, Lee decided it was a time for a change of scenery.

Utilising his experience in music journalism, Lee now works within the web team at Dawsons Music, where he can still relay his passion for music by producing great content for the Dawsons blog and social media. Lee is still an avid guitar player and writer.

Here are some fun facts:

  • Before moving to the UK, Lee used to host a radio show in Australia at the age of 18. Lee presented the unsigned bands segment at Twin Cities FM in Perth, WA.
  • Sound Of Guns enjoyed a short but successful career in music with many of their songs being used in television adverts, sports channels and the extremely successful videos Road Bike Party and We are Not Crazy We are Amazing.
  • He also can’t play bar chords due to an accident so learned to play power chords by studying Black Sabbath songs and Tony Iommi’s playing style.