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Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation Overview

Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation Overview

Futuristic performance meets timeless design…

Since its release the Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation has wowed fans of Yamaha’s previous masterpiece, the Tyros, whilst winning over newcomers in the process. For live performers it is a truly marvellous piece of kit, offering a whopping 1700 voices generated by Yamaha’s industry-standard AWM sound engine. Thanks to an intuitive control layout with real-time functionality, the Genos runs seamlessly through the most ambitious of performances. On top of this there’s 60 GB of solid-state memory to store anything and everything for rapid recall, built-in Wi-Fi along with extensive wired connectivity options, amongst a whole host of other features. As if all that wasn’t enough, there a Yamaha Genos Update coming soon too.

Let’s take a closer look at this magnificent machine.

Stress-free workflow

Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation

Yamaha know a thing or two when it comes eliminating hurdles between a musician and their instrument. The Genos benefits from decades of user experience feedback in to provide a controller arrangement that is immediately familiar. Along with the generous 76-key FSX keyboard that boasts premium action with aftertouch, you’ll find a large LCD colour touch screen to access sound library information and changes many parameters on the fly. There are slider, knobs and assignable buttons across the work surface for you to make the Genos your own.

Studio-grade sound engine

As well as their AWM sampling technology, Yamaha also infused the Genos with AEM (Articulation Element Modelling), which simulates the subtle nuances of musical instruments and how they respond. Therefore, the Genos affords a hyper-realistic synthesized representation of any acoustic instrument that you wish to play.

On top of all that there’s the Revo!Drum/SFX, Drum Voices that recreate authentic drum sounds. Even if you hit the same key repeatedly, the reproduction changes in the most subtle ways as if you were striking an acoustic percussion instrument. Genius!

Add to the mix 1,710 instrument sounds, 550 backing patterns, 216 arpeggios and much, much more – you’ll never be short of something to get your teeth stuck into.

Swimming in FX

Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation

Whether you want to be awash with reverb, clamping down on compression, getting Rotary Speaker involvement or want to crank up the distortion, the Genos’ heavyweight DSP (digital signal processing) power if the stuff of legend. By incorporating the same VCM (Virtual Circuit Modelling) technology as seen in their high-end mixing consoles, Yamaha equip you with effects that sound glorious with elaborate graphical user interface control too.

Monster memory

A 60GB internal solid-state drive allows you to capture your performances in all their glory. Content-rich vocal performances, highly intricate compositions, effects-laden improv, everything is retained faithfully. There’re also 2GB of built-in expansion memory with the three USB-to-device sockets so that you can download and take your music with you.

Stay connected

Yamaha Genos Digital Workstation

Across the rear panel there’s a wealth of connectivity options for you to explore across both analogue and digital. Thanks to the enhanced Digital to Analogue converters, the Genos can sit at the heart of any studio setup. There is support for condenser mics thanks to the built-in phantom power, as well as MIDI ports and USB-to-host for direct connection to Mac or PC.

Built-in Wi-Fi enables connection to the SongBook+ app, which is fantastic for those who want to keep preset song data to hand. SongBook+ allows you to manage songs with information such as lyrics and/or sheet music, playback, MIDI files, videos, etc.

Upcoming firmware update (June 2019)

Never ones to rest on their laurels, Yamaha are bringing out an update that will make the Genos better than ever. Oh, and did we mention that it’s free!

About The Author

Jon Whittaker

Jon is a multi-instrumentalist with a passion for inspiring others to get involved in making music. After spending many years playing venues here, there and - pretty much - everywhere, he joined the Dawsons' Music Web Team before progressing into his current role managing the Dawsons Blog.